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'Extraordinary Women' in Beverley Guildhall

A Bridlington Informer News Item from Bridlington.net - Visit Bridlington Informer

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A new exhibition, entitled "Extraordinary Women", opens at the Beverley Guildhall on Wednesday, 21 November.

The exhibition looks at some of the women of Beverley who have stood out in history for one reason or another, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of women receiving the vote.

The Guildhall curator, Fiona Jenkinson, said: "It is actually quite difficult to see women in history, which is dominated by the achievements of men. The women who have stood out are mainly those who have produced a lasting legacy, such as artworks or books.

"The exhibition features a number of these, such as Mary Elwell and Mary Wollstonecraft, as well as women such as Hilda Lyon who invented the 'Lyon Shape' used in American submarines, and Elizabeth Bielby, a medical missionary to India. In addition, however, we have also found women such as Annie Woodmansey, a well-regarded Beverley washerwoman, and Ann Sutton, who ran a body-snatcher gang on Beckside. We hope people will find these women equally as interesting as those who were perhaps more memorable."

"Extraordinary Women" opens at the Beverley Guildhall on Wednesday, 21 November and runs until 15 March, 2019. The Guildhall is located in Register Square next to the main post office. Over the winter the building is open from 10am to 1pm every Wednesday and 10am to 4pm every Friday, but will be closed between Christmas and New Year. Admission is always free.

As usual, the Guildhall will also be open from 10am to 3pm on Sunday, 9 December for Beverley's Festival of Christmas. In addition to presenting a weekend opportunity to see the new exhibition, the children's activities in the courtroom and refreshments in the parlour provide a haven of calm from the bustle of the crowded streets.

Photos 

Left Mary Elwell : studio portrait

Right Miss Elizabeth Stephenson, who ran a school for young ladies in the 1820s.