Danes Dyke - Flamborough - Beacon Hill

A local walk around the area providing lovely scenery and gentle exercise.

 
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Danes Dyke - Flamborough - Beacon Hill

This walk takes us to the highest point on the southern headland, Beacon Hill, home to Beaker Man. It includes field paths, minor roads and cliff top walking. Some Steps

Start/finish: Danes Dyke or Flamborough Village
Grade: Moderate
Length type: Medium
Length miles (kilometres): 3 (5)
OS Explorer map: 301
Car Parking: Danes Dyke
Toilets: Danes Dyke, Flamborough North Landing.
Refreshments: Cafe at Danes Dyke car park, Several Pubs in Flamborough Village.

LDanes Dyke Walkeave Danes Dyke and its birdsong along the vehicular exit road through the plantation. Leave the road by the sign posted path and follow the field headlands to Flamborough Village. In the last field before the village earth works can be seen. It is believed these were ancient fish ponds belonging to the manor in 1559. Reminders of the past can be found all around you on most walks, its up to you to look for them. Parts of the old medieval ridge and furrow farming system can also be seen. If you fancy a pint and a snack, there are several village inns which are unspoilt friendly places that serve some of the best food in the area. From the village, follow the back lanes on map near the church to Beacon Farm. Can you spot the unusual weather vane on the church? Head southwards through the farmyard and then around a former gravel quarry to the cliff top. This is Beacon Hill and it has quite a history.

Evidence of Mesolithic, early Neolithic and Beaker occupation has been found in this remote high place, which was probably a good vantage point and a place to fish and catch fowl. Why didn't they choose the sheltered water fed inlet at Danes Dyke? Part of the ground floor plan of an oval timber built Beaker house has been found and traces of Beaker Man are extremely rare in Great Britain.

The Romans were possibly here using the high ground as a signal station, as 4th Century pottery has been found and sandstone blocks similar to those at the Roman signal station at Filey unearthed during quarrying. They established signal stations along the coast as threats from northern tribes and Anglo Saxon raiders increased.

Danes Dyke WalkBeacon Hill takes its name from the beacons that stood there from the 16th Century. There were three on the headland in 1588. One was on the headland, one at the northern end of Danes Dyke and one at Beacon Hill, which still stood there in 1834. They consisted of iron hoops holding iron pans and were lit to give warning of invasion, the Spaniards and their Armada being intent on a take-over. If one strange ship was sited, one light was fired. For many strange ships, two lights were fired and for an actual invasion, all three were fired. A network of beacons existed on various high points inland to give warning to York. You lit your three pans, they-shut the gates! In all, 52 beacons existed in the East Riding.

After the Romans, the Vikings probably also used the high ground as a vantage point - and now you to admire the view. The Roman Galleys and Viking Long ships have long gone, to be replaced with the sometimes raucous fishing parties with their crates of brown ale - have things changed?

The return is made along the cliff top path and across the steep, stepped gully at Hartendale to return to Danes Dyke. The views are again over busy Bridlington Bay and the long low coastline of Holderness. On a clear day, Withernsea lighthouse can be seen. In winter only the odd fishing boat can be seen but if there is a northerly wind, many sea birds shelter in the bay. Most walks change throughout the seasons and always try a walk again at a different time of the year. Over the years, you'll find it rewarding and interesting .

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