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Bridlington Priory Organ |

Bridlington Priory Organ

Bridlington Priory written by the late John. W. Lamb, M.A., Ph.D.

In 1789 the first Organ was installed to take the place of a quartet of two violins., a bassoon and a clarinet. A larger instrument was erected in 1834, which was replaced in 1889 by an instrument built by Messrs. Anneessens of Belgium. It possessed all the brightness characteristic of the Continental Organ, being rich in reed stops and having a thirty-two foot Contra Tuba.

Successive rebuilding and restoration work were made in 1909, 1922, 1949 and 1956 and on each occasion English stops were added. In 1968 it was found necessary completely to re-build the Organ, when a detached four manual console was placed at the North West in the Chancel.

The present Instrument incorporates all the latest developments of electrical science applied with such ingenuity and skill to modern organ building. It has 4,151 pipes, 100 draw-stops (including 23 couplers and two tremulants), 45 thumb-pistons, 26 toe-pistons and balanced crescendo pedals to the Swell and Solo Organs.. With the utmost care the fine tonal qualities of the original Continental Organ have been preserved and the English work maintains the highest traditions.
There are placed at the command of the Organist a French, German and English ensemble of an incalculable variety of resources for use in divine worship, and in the Recitals for which the Priory is known in the United Kingdom and Overseas. Indeed, the expressive beauty of the music which can be drawn from this superb Instrument matches the grandeur and beauty of the Priory which it serves.

In the Oak Screen overlooking the Chapter Vestry has been placed a bishop's mitre carved in oak. This was taken from the original Flemish Screen which was erected during the incumbency of Bishop Hellmuth (1885-1891), a former Bishop of Huron and later Assistant Bishop of Ripon.