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Bridlington Town Guide 1929

Mike Wilson, Local Author and Historian

The sun, whose rays are all ablaze with ever living glory,
Rises each day across our Bay, and Bridlington's true story
Is often told in waves of gold. "Bright Bridlington" we name her,
And if her fame exceed her name, well, I for one don't blame her.

These are the opening words in the 1929 Bridlington Guide Book. A little flowery perhaps for today's readers, but in those days local author Miss M. K. Dennett was asked to write the words for the brochure.

She seems to have written her words in some golden glow which seems to have existed in the Twenties, this booklet arriving ten years after the end of the 'war to end all wars,' while just over the horizon is another as yet unseen major conflict. Perhaps she was right to view the present then and her future in positive terms.

Among the chief assets of the town, she relates that "Ida the Flame Bearer lived in ancient times and left his name for legacy in the Flamborough of today." I'd not heard of that legend until I read it in this guide book.

Of the Spa, she says: ". . . built only three years ago at a cost of nearly £50,000. Here more than 4,000 people can be entertained simultaneously, the immense dance floor being surrounded by a deep terrace, and spacious balconies above giving a perfect view to a great number of onlookers. The Hall itself is a beautiful building with a stained-glass dome, and deep windows which are constructed so that the whole front of the building is of glass."

Miss Dennett mentions that, the previous year, H.R.H. Princess Mary opened the splendid new Sea Wall, to which she gave her name: Princess Mary Promenade.

In her section on boating and fishing she says: "Pleasure boating can be indulged in on a scale that is almost unique, for every type of craft is employed, from the turbine screw steamer "Yorkshireman" to the little rowing boats which are available in large numbers." Present-day visitors are now denied the innocent pleasure of rowing in the harbour or into the Bay through what may be described as the interference of health and safety concerns.

Sunshine records for 1928 show that April had 148.4 hours of sunshine, May 161.4, June 197.9, July 268.6, August 190.1 and September 160.3. Perhaps the sun did shine more in the 'old days' when I was a lad.

Four images from the 1929 brochure, showing glamour on the beach, children playing, the latest fashion in swimwear and donkey riding. 

This view shows the Fun City on the right with crowded beaches and changing tents.

Charabancs were very popular in the late Twenties, comfortable enclosed coaches things of the future. Mr Gautier was a star at Bridlington in those days. He could apparently be thrown off the north pier - at high tide I'm glad to say - fully manacled. He would free himself then swim to Flamborough Head. "Yorkshireman" arrived in 1920 and sailed from Bridlington many years.

This is the back cover to the Guide Book. In those days, people travelled here for Sea and Sun. What facet of Bridlington is at the top of people's interests now? I hope that "Bridlington, twinned with Walmington-on-Sea" brings visitors flocking here.